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American School of Classical Studies at Athens

http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/admission-membership/grants

 

STUDY IN GREECE 2017-2018
ASCSA PROGRAMS AND FELLOWSHIPS

 

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens, one of America’s most distinguished centers devoted to advanced teaching and research, was founded in 1881 to provide American graduate students and scholars a base for their studies in the history and civilization of the Greek world. Today, over 135 years later, it is still a teaching institution, providing graduate students a unique opportunity to study firsthand the sites and monuments of Greece. The School is also a superb resource for senior scholars pursuing research in many fields ranging from prehistoric to modern Greece, thanks to its internationally renowned libraries, the Blegen, focusing on all aspects of Greece from its earliest prehistory to late antiquity, and the Gennadius, which concentrates on the Greek world after the end of antiquity.

 

Membership application to the ASCSA must be made online at http://www.ascsa.edu.gr at the same time you apply to any outside funding organization for work at the School.

 

FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS OR POSTGRADUATES FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA (SHORT-TERM FELLOWSHIPS)

 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF AMERICA (AIA) ANNA C. AND OLIVER C. COLBURN FELLOW: Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D.’s whose field is classical archaeology. Contact the AIA, Boston, MA for information. Applications completed on website: www.archaeological.org. Stipend of $5,500. Next competition is 2018-2019 academic year.

 

THE HENRY S. ROBINSON CORINTH RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP: Ph.D. candidate or Ph.D. for research on a doctoral dissertation or primary publication specifically on Corinth, requiring the use of the resources, archaeological site, and collections at the ASCSA excavations at Ancient Corinth. Open to all nationalities. The Robinson Fellowship may not be held concurrently with another School fellowship. One or more grants for up to three months, maximum amount of stipend is $4,000. School fees are waived. Next competition is 2018-2019 academic year.

 

TRAVELING AND EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS AND POSTGRADUATE STUDY

OSCAR pursue work through trips to sites, museums, or repositories of materials of interest to the Fellow's studies. To be announced.

 

MELLON MEDITERRANEAN REGIONAL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM (CAORC): US citizen, Ph.D. candidate or recent Ph.D., researching in the humanities and related social sciences in countries bordering the Mediterranean and served by American overseas research centers. Fellowship program funded by the Mellon Foundation. Consult CAORC website for application and deadline: www.caorc.org.

 

MULTI-COUNTRY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS, Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC): Ph.D. candidates and postdoctoral scholars with research in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences requiring travel to several countries with an American overseas research center. Consult CAORC website for application and deadline: www.caorc.org.

 

FUNDING FOR SENIOR SCHOLARS FOR STUDY AT THE ASCSA

 

NEH FELLOWSHIPS: Awards for postdoctoral scholars and professionals in the humanities. Terms: Two to four fellowships, five to ten months in duration. Maximum stipend for a five-month project, $21,000; for a ten-month project, $42,000. School fees are waived. U.S. citizens or foreign nationals being U.S. residents for three years before application deadline. Applicants must hold their Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree at the time of application. DEADLINE: OCTOBER 31, 2017.

 

ASCSA programs are generally open to qualified students and scholars at colleges or universities in the U.S. or Canada; restrictions may apply for specific fellowships and programs. The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership.

 

 


 

 

 

INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY

School of Historical Studies, Opportunities for Scholars 2018-2019.

 

The Institute is an independent private institution founded in 1930 to create a community of scholars focused on intellectual inquiry, free from teaching and other university obligations. Ancient History is one of the School’s principal interests, but the program is open to all fields of historical research. Scholars from around the world come to the Institute to pursue their own research. Candidates of any nationality may apply for a single term or a full academic year. Scholars may apply for a stipend, but those with sabbatical funding, other grants, retirement funding, or other means are also invited to apply for a non-stipendiary membership. Some short-term visitorships (for less than a full term, and without stipend) are also available on an ad-hoc basis.

 

The Institute provides access to extensive resources including offices, libraries, subsidized restaurant and housing facilities, and some secretarial services. Residence in Princeton during term time is required. The only other obligation of Members is to pursue their own research. The Ph.D. (or equivalent) and substantial publications are required. Information and application forms may be found on the School=s web site, www.hs.ias.edu, or contact the School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Dr., Princeton, N.J. 08540 (E-mail address: mzelazny@ias.edu). Deadline: November 1 2017.

 

 

 


 

 

 

Request for Proposals: Scott R. Jacobs Fund.

 

The purpose of the fund is to support Studies on Alexander the Great in North America. Subjects of the proposals must concentrate on Alexander, his context (Macedonia or the Fourth Century B.C.E) or his legacy in the Ancient World. Grants will be made to support research, research travel, as well as travel for the presentation of papers at recognized scholarly conferences or occasionally whole sessions at recognized scholarly conferences. Proposals should be sent to winthrop.adams@utah.edu

 

Qualifications: Applications will be taken from doctoral students and junior faculty, with exceptions made based on the quality of the proposal, fund requests and overall number of qualified applicants.

 

Applications: Applications will be reviewed twice, annually, and are due April 1st or November 1st. Applications must include a Curriculum Vitae, Proposal with bibliography, and a Budget for the requested funds. Only applications that are complete by the due dates will be considered. A particular project will be considered only once by the Committee, and candidates may make only one application in any given year. 


Applications will be distributed to the Committee members electronically. Committee members will deliberate and rate the applications on their own and communicate decisions to one another by e-mail. All decisions will be by simple majority. In the event of a tie, the proposal shall not be funded. All decisions made by the Committee will be final. The Committee is not required to explain or justify its decision to candidates.

 

Grants: The grants will vary in size depending on the project proposal and need. However, consideration of all grants is made on the basis of quality.

 

Announcements: The call for proposals will be made in the Association of Ancient Historians Newsletter and on the AAH announcement e-mail list. Notification of the grants themselves will be made to the applicants no later than April 15th or November 15th, depending on the cycle in which the proposals were made. Announcement of the recipients will be made in the AAH Newsletter and on the AAH electronic announcements.

 

 

 


 

 

 

Balkan Heritage Field School (BHFS) has opened the application session for the first available projects in the next field school season in 2017.

 

You can find more detailed information about the available field schools and offers in our brochure and poster for Season 2017.

 

The available projects/courses take place at different excavation sites and historic places in Bulgaria and Republic of Macedonia related to all major cultures and civilizations that once existed in the Balkans; starting with the first Neolithic farmers in Europe and Europe's first civilization in the Copper Age, the collapsing Late Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean, followed by the Ancient Greek, Thracian, Roman, Byzantine, Bulgarian, and Ottoman civilizations. Along with the excavation projects, there are conservation workshops/courses currently available on ancient Greek pottery, Roman and Late Antique pottery and glassware, mosaics and wall-paintings based on work with authentic artifacts.


New projects in maritime archaeology, vernacular Balkan architecture, conservation of artifacts in Greece, as well as a new Roman dig in Montenegro will be available in the upcoming weeks. Be sure to check out our website at: http://www.bhfieldschool.org for news, exciting surprises and great deals for the new season!


Academic credits are available upon request to students participating in the BHFS through our academic partners in EU, USA and Canada.

 

 


 

 

 

Archaeology and Geophysics of the Roman Frontier Field School (Transylvania, Romania)

 

We are continuing to make great strides into a new understanding of the development of the Roman frontier populations. Dacia (i.e. modern historical Transylvania) was, arguably, the most important frontier of the Roman Empire: its gold and silver sustained the collapsing imperial economy for two centuries. However, the “imperial idea” on the Eastern European Provincial frontier was more complex that Rome ever expected it… and it even outlasted the idea of Rome itself. Local Roman Provincial realities, born out of economic, cultural, social and political creolization, constant and dynamic negotiation of power, and shifting populations have outlived the ideological centers that have claimed historical ownership of these regions, creating their own distinct expressions of identity.

Our programs offer a very extensive approach to the anthropology and archaeology of the Roman frontier environments, through field work, laboratory analysis and lectures. Our participants will be able to experience several field approaches, ranging from Classical excavation, anthropological site exploration, traditional STP (shovel test pit), geochemical soil (phosphate) and geophysical (Ground Penetrating Radar – GPR) surveys, aerial and satellite imagery analysis. Our programs provide a complete and scientifically integrated approach to a Classical site, in a very complex environment, in a region fundamentally important to our understanding of European genesis.

Our programs:

Roman Provincial Settlement Excavation and Survey – Life by the Imperial Roads
Location: Rapolt, Hunedoara County, Transylvania - Romania
Dates:
Session 3: July 2 - July 22, 2017
E-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org
Description: The project integrates Classical excavation approaches with various exploratory field techniques, ranging from STP (shovel test pits), geochemical soil analysis (phosphate spot testing), and surface field collection coupled with topographical total station assisted mapping. We will be looking at the transformation of the countryside in relation to the development of the Imperial road river infrastructure, and the role of our “palatial villa” in the development of a "creole" Roman landscape. Cost: US$ 1295 per session (program fees, equipment, room and board - see flyer for details).

Roman Villa Excavation – Identity and Wealth on the Roman Frontier
Location: Rapolt, Hunedoara County, Transylvania - Romania
Dates:
Session 2: July 2 - July 22, 2017
Session 3: July 23 – August 12, 2017
E-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org
Description: The integrated results of our various field techniques have yielded extraordinary results: a rural built space of ca. one hectare, with massive fortification walls decorated with exterior frescoes, with richly built two stories buildings, containing exceptional artifacts (well preserved bronze statues, jewelry, pristine condition coins, writing implements, etc.). Our target excavation, the central building of the “villa” has already presented us with a very complex and surprising occupation sequence and practices. Cost: US$ 1295 per session (program fees, equipment, room and board - see flyer for details).

Applied Field Geophysics Workshop – Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Workshop
Location: Rapolt, Hunedoara County, Transylvania - Romania
Dates: 3-day intensive GPR program, integrated with our field programs
E-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org
Description: Our program offers intensive training in Ground Penetrating Radar exploration techniques, both field and laboratory analysis, as it applies to the anthropogenic transformation of a historical landscape, in this case, the hinterland of the “palatial villa” and associated structures, roads and land use. All participants registered to two field sessions of the above can participate to the Geophysics Workshop free of cost. Otherwise, cost: US$ 385 (program fees, equipment, full room and board).

Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Applications

 

Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Applications

Location: Odorhei, Harghita County, Transylvania - Romania
Dates: 3-day intensive GPR program, exploring a newly discovered site
E-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org
Description: Our program builds on the intensive training in Ground Penetrating Radar exploration techniques provided during our Applied Field Geophysics Workshop (prerequisite), focusing on advanced data collection and analysis. The workshop consists of a brand new GPR mapping project on a lost medieval church and its associated cemetery near Odorhei. It is the perfect site for advanced GPR training: it has everything - walls, floors, at least one crypt, destruction levels, graves, complex cross-cutting relationships. Cost: US$ 385 (program fees, equipment, full room and board)

Our participants will not only explore the archaeology of the region, but have the opportunity to sample the magic of Transylvania, through its amazing historical and natural landscapes.

Our programs are available for both credit students and non-credit participants.

 

 


 

 

 

The third Swansea Summer School in Ancient Languages will run from 23rd July – 5th August 2017.


The summer school, offering Latin and Greek at all levels, as well as Hieroglyphs and Medieval Latin, is open to all ages 12+. We welcome applications from pupils and teachers who would like to try a new language or build upon their existing knowledge.

 

Intensive courses in Beginners, Post-Beginner, Intermediate, Intermediate-Advanced, and Advances Latin and Greek, Beginners and Post-Beginners Hieroglyphics, and Medieval Latin.

 

Classes are small and informal and taught by experiences teachers. Non-residential or residential (on-campus accommodations) are available. Bursaries are available for students and people on low income.

 

For further information and payment forms,  http://www.swansea.ac.uk/classics/summerschoolinancientlanguages or contact Dr. Catherine Rozier at catherine.rozier@swansea.ac.uk.

 

Apply by June 7, 2017.

 

 


 

 

 

Got Latin? Got Greek?

 

Linguistic preparation is crucial for success in many fields of graduate study. Students must command the languages of their primary sources in order to pursue valid research. But the opportunity to establish the competence in Ancient Greek or Latin needed for graduate work in Classics or related fields doesn’t always open up early enough within undergraduate programs. The Department of Classical Studies of Loyola University Chicago now offers a Post-Baccalaureate program so that students who have completed bachelor’s degrees may build the proficiency their further careers demand. Coursework at the post-baccalaureate level also introduces some of the scholarship of Classical texts in which graduate study engages. Post-Baccalaureate students become able to clarify their professional goals while they sharpen their technical skills and become better qualified to advance on the path they choose.

 

Loyola’s Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program in Classical Studies is shaped in terms of competence attained, rather than a fixed period of study. The Certificate will be awarded to students who successfully complete two semesters totaling 18 “target” credit-hours at the 300-level in both Classical languages with a GPA of 3.0 in the program. “Target” study in these two semesters should include at least 6 credit-hours in 300-level ancient Greek author-courses and at least 6 credit-hours in 300-level Latin author-courses. We recognize some students will have attained intermediate or advanced competence in both languages before their post-baccalaureate study and will need only two semesters of target-level work; some may have had the opportunity to become proficient in one Classical language but have weaker preparation in the other; some may need to begin their study of both languages and will need additional coursework to complete the Certificate. Our program will meet you where you are in your own career of study, and work with you to bring your skills and knowledge up to the next stage.

 

Faculty in the Department hold Ph.D.s in Classical Studies from top-ranked North American and British universities. Their research specialties include Greek and Roman literature, history, religion, and archaeology; papyrology; textual criticism; feminist approaches to the Classics; and literary theory. Individual students’ curriculums will be determined in collaboration with the Department’s Post-Baccalaureate Program Director. To learn more, please visit our web-pages at www.luc.edu/classicalstudies. Inquiries can be directed to Dr. Greg Dobrov, the Post-Baccalaureate Program Director (gdobrov@luc.edu).

 

Candidates for the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Classical Studies should have:

Bachelor’s degree in hand at the time of matriculation in the program and, normally, a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0


They should submit in their applications:

official transcripts for all undergraduate-level study pursued to date

a well-thought-out statement of purpose explaining how the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate fits in their projected career of study

a list of courses taken at the undergraduate level in Classical Studies or related fields, forming a basis for their projected career of study

two letters of recommendation from instructors in Classical Studies or related fields who have worked with them

in the case of candidates for whom English is not a first language, TOEFL results


On-line applications can be submitted at www.luc.edu/gpem; inquiries GradApp@luc.edu.

 

 


 

 

 

The Rise and Fall: Environmental Factors in the Socio-Cultural Changes of the Ancient Silk Road Area: Call for Papers

International workshop
September 28-29, 2017
Kiel University, Germany

 

Conveners:
Dr. Liang E. Yang, Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Kiel University
Prof. Dr. Josef Wiesehöfer, Institute of Classical Antiquity, Kiel University
Prof. Dr. Hans-Rudolf Bork, Institute for Ecosystem Research, Kiel University
Millinda Hoo, Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Kiel University

Supported by: Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Kiel University
Past Global Changes project (PAGES)

The Silk Road is a modern concept for an ancient network of trade routes that for centuries facilitated and intensified processes of cultural interaction and goods exchange between West China, Central Asia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean. The Silk Road flourished when the Han dynasty explored Central Asia around 139 BCE and thrived throughout Antiquity and far into Middle Ages under the Islamic and Mongol Empires.

 

Along the ancient Silk Road, empires, dynasties and the associated institutions, social structures, and economic systems changed for several reasons. There is increasing discussion that climate and environmental factors may also have played a role in fostering economic and socio-cultural changes along the Silk Road and in a broader area. Coherent patterns and synchronous events in history suggest possible links between social upheaval and climate/environment forces; in some cases, environmental factors have been claimed as multipliers that accelerated socio-cultural changes. Such links between climatic, environmental, economic, social, and cultural changes would have manifested themselves differently according to place and time; however, it often remains unclear if and how exactly they affect socio-cultural situations on the ground.

 

The Silk Road serves as the geographical scope and inspirational concept for the workshop. The objective of this workshop is to increase our understanding of the role played by the environment in socio-cultural changes that occurred in the territories along the ancient Silk Roads, and to initiate a network of young researchers to facilitate international connectivity and multidisciplinary cooperation. Specific topics include (but are not limited to):


· Paleoclimate and environment changes in the Silk Road area
· Proxy reconstructions of environment disasters and socio-cultural consequences
· Climate-related human migration and demographic changes
· Conflicts, cooperation, institution, and social organization under environmental stresses
· Quantitative, qualitative, and material culture approaches to analyzing relationships between environmental and social and cultural changes

The workshop especially encourages junior researchers (PhD students and postdocs) to participate. Interested participants are encouraged to submit a 500 word abstract via email lyang@gshdl.uni-kiel.de by June 30, 2017, and state the willingness to submit a full paper. Full paper is due by the time of the workshop for the peer review process, and a book of the proceedings will be published by early 2018.

 

Authors will be notified of acceptance/rejection by 14 July 2017. Those selected to contribute to the workshop will receive full funding to cover the costs of participation.

Contact: Dr. Liang Emlyn Yang (lyang@gshdl.uni-kiel.de)
Website: http://pastglobalchanges.org/calendar/upcoming/127-pages/1708-silk-road-wshop-17
http://www.gshdl.uni-kiel.de/download/calendar/CfP_SilkRoad_Workshop2017.pdf

 

 


 

 

 

Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean World,
A Brill Companion to Classical Studies Series

 

Series Editor: Lee L. Brice

 

Aims and Scope
The aim of the series is to publish high-quality, useful volumes each focused on a specific topic related to warfare in the ancient Mediterranean world. Where appropriate, volume coverage should include the eastern Mediterranean, including Assyria, Persia, Anatolia the Levant, and Egypt as well as Greece and Rome. The intended audience includes scholarly specialist and non specialists. Topics already published or in process include insurgency and terrorism, dealing with defeat, women and warfare, discipline, asymmetric warfare, and Late Antiquity. We are seeking new proposals on a variety of topics covering a wide range of issues and methodologies. Specific topics we are interested in include reception, military historiography, medicine/death, Persia, Hellenistic world, archaeology/material culture and warfare, auxilia, the Pax Romana, Animals and war, Navies, and peace, but we welcome proposals on any appropriate topic.

 

Submission of Proposals
Volume proposals on any appropriate topic are welcome for consideration. Proposals should be for complete volumes only and may have one or more editors, who will be responsible for finding contributors. Since these are edited volumes, proposals need to include volume organization, list of contributors, and paragraph length abstracts of proposed chapters. Volumes are typically 400-450 pages (around 144,000 words) with twelve-sixteen contributors. Contributing authors should be sought widely (not only Anglo-American scholars), but all final chapters must be submitted in English. Proposals are first screened by the series editor who evaluates their pertinence and quality. If the proposal is deemed ready and will make a useful contribution to the series, then the proposal will be reviewed by an outside reader. If accepted, the editor will be invited to proceed with the manuscript which is, ideally, due eighteen months later. All manuscripts go through peer-review once submitted.

Questions and Submissions
If you have questions about potential topics, would like more information, or wish to submit a proposal please contact Lee L. Brice via email, ll-brice@wiu.edu.

 

 


 

 

 

The Journal of Ancient History is now accepting submissions.

 

Aims and Scope:
The Journal of Ancient History aims to provide a forum for scholarship covering all aspects of ancient history and culture from the Archaic Period to Late Antiquity (roughly the ninth century BCE through the sixth century CE). The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles concerning the history and historiography (ancient and modern) of the ancient Mediterranean world and of neighboring civilizations in their relations with it. The journal is open to submissions in disciplines closely related to ancient history, including epigraphy, numismatics, religion and law.

 

Please see our website for submission information:
http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jah

 

 


 

 

 

De Gruyter is pleased to announce the Journal of Ancient Near Eastern History. Please visit our website: www.degruyter.com/janeh/

JANEH is an international, double blind peer reviewed journal that will be published by De Gruyter twice a year beginning in 2014. The first issue will be freely available online for 6 months after its publication.

 

Aims and scope:
The Journal of Ancient Near Eastern History seeks to encourage and stimulate the study of the history of the ancient Near East, which is broadly defined to include areas from Iran to the western Anatolian coast and the Black Sea to Southern Arabia from its prehistoric foundations to the Late Antique period. The journal is also interested in interactions with other regions and cultures, such as Ancient Egypt, the Mediterranean World, the Indian Ocean and Central Asia. Articles may focus on any aspect of history (political, social, economic, cultural, intellectual, etc.) and of modern historiography. The journal seeks to integrate the study of the ancient Near East firmly in the historical discipline in general and encourages its authors to take into account current methodological debates and approaches.

 

Founding Editor: Marc Van De Mieroop, Columbia University

Editor: Steven J. Garfinkle, Western Washington University

Editorial Board:

Lucinda Dirven, Universiteit Amsterdam
Michael Kozuh, Auburn University
Jacob Lauinger, Johns Hopkins University
Karen Radner, University College London
Francesca Rochberg, University of California, Berkeley

 

The editors are pleased to invite submissions. Submissions are accepted in English, French, and German. Information for authors is included on our website.

 

In addition to the aims and scope above, JANEH seeks to provide a timely venue for scholarly publication in the history of the ancient Near East. In most cases, the time from submission to final editorial decision will not exceed 70 days.

 

JANEH will be published online and in print. For submissions following the inaugural issue, articles will be published online immediately after final acceptance and the editorial process is complete, and they will enter the queue for print publication.We look forward to your participation!

 

 


 

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